Category Archives: Raspberry

Blogppost related to the Raspberry Pi

How to get rid of Raspberry PI SSH warning: Setting locale failed

As I am using Mac OS, I get error messages when using the build-in shell of OSx (perl: warning: Setting locale failed). In order to get rid of these messages I amended .bashrc

sudo nano .bashrc

and included the following command:

export LC_ALL=C

ctrl-x, Y and enter to save

sudo reboot

That’s it!

Screen Shot 2013-12-21 at 16.09.50

Raspberry Pi master controls Arduino UNO slaves via I2C

OK, I finally have the software up and running to control my Arduino (or up to 127 of them) from a single Raspberry Pi.

My objective was to add a simple way to control the i/o ports on the Arduino both analog and digital from my Raspberry Pi. Besides controlling them, I also wanted to be able to read the values on the pins, both digital & analog. Already at an early stage I figured to use the I2C interface. It’s pretty simple and straight forward and works with a bunch of other devices.

So, what I did, is turn the Arduino UNO in a slave, waiting for the commands from the Raspberry Pi.

I implemented the following commands:

setPin(device, pin, mode)
This is the equivalent of the pinMode(pin, mode).
Usage e.g. setPin(33, “13”, “OUPUT”).
INPUT, OUTPUT and INPUT_PULLUP are supported.

writePin(device, pin, value)
This is the equivalent of digitalWrite(pin, value).
Usage e.g. writePin(33, “13”, “HIGH”)

analogWritePin(device, pin, value)
This is the equivalent of analogWrite(pin, value) and can only be used on the PWM capable pins.
Usage e.g. writePin(33, “6”, “120”)

getStatus(device)
This asks the Arduino to read all the pins and return the values in a single 30 byte string. The Arduino performs a digital read on all the digital pins and an analog read on all the analog pins. The digital pins that are PWM enabled, are not read in case the PWM is in use. Because a read event would interrupt the PWM cycle, instead a P is returned as value.
A return string could look like this: 11000000000P011023000005121023 and can be read as follows: pin 0 and 1 are HIGH, pin 2 – 10 are LOW, pin 11 is in PWM mode, pin 12 is low, pin 13 is HIGH, A0 = 1023, A1 = 0000, A2 = 0512 and A3 = 1023.

A4 and A5 can’t be used as the pins are required for the I2C communication. 

pinValue(device, pin)
this is the equivalent of both digitalRead(pin) and analogRead(pin), it returns the value that is currently read for the specific pin.

The Python code for the raspberry can be found here.

In order to make use of the Raspberry Pi Master, you need to install the slave code on the Arduino. You need Arduino_I2C_slave_v0_21. This slave version v0_21 is not fully compatible with the Arduino Master software from my previous post and only works 100% with the Raspberry Pi.

I’m just a beginning programmer, so any feedback for me to improve is really appreciated. I’ve tried to document the programs extensively in the code.

The I2C wiring is quite simple as well. You could use an I2C connection without level shifter between the 3.3v Raspberry Pi and 5v Arduino as signals are send by pulling the signal low. However, I prefer using a level shifter in order to avoid problems.

The code on the RPi to control the Arduino could look like this if you wanted to blink the LED on pin 13:

import I2C_Master_v0.2.py

setPin(33, “13”, “Output”)

while True:
writePin(33,” 13″, “High”)
    print (“Status pin 13 = ” + pinValue(33,’13’))
    writePin(33,”13″,”Low”)

After every message from the Raspberry Pi to the Arduino a 1 sec pause is included in the code in order to avoid a request overload on the Arduino, because the Arduino is much slower than the Raspberry Pi. It would get interrupted before completing the command.

Happy tinkering!

Racer993

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Uno connected via I2C.

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Uno connected via I2C.

This is the RPI code:

I2C_Master_v0_2.py (click to download from my dropbox)

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#// Arduino I2C Wire master version 0.2
#// Turns the Raspberry Pi into a I2C master device using I2C-tools.
#// send commands to the I2C Arduino slave for configuring pins,
#// read and write to pins via a simple instruction set.
#// the i2c-tools are required use "sudo apt-get install i2c-tools"
#// the I2C slave software must be installed on the Arduino
#// Supported instructions
#// pinMode             = setPin(device, pinnumber, INPUT/OUTPUT/INPUT_PULLUP)
#// digitalWrite        = writePin(device,pinnumber,HIGH/LOW)
#// analogWrite (=PWM)  = analogWritePin(device,pinnumber,0-255)
#// digital/analog read = getStatus(device) reads all the digital/analog pins
#// digital/analog read = pinValue gets the value for a single pin
#// A0 - analog read / digital write
#// A1 - analog read / digital write
#// A2 - analog read / digital write
#// A3 - analog read / digital write
#// A4 - IN USE as SDA
#// A5 - IN USE as SCL
#//  1 - digital read / write + RX
#//  2 - digital read / write + TX  + Interrupt
#//  3 - digital read / write + PWM + Interrupt
#//  4 - digital read / write
#//  5 - digital read / write + PWM
#//  6 - digital read / write + PWM
#//  7 - digital read / write
#//  8 - digital read / write
#//  9 - digital read / write + PWM
#// 10 - digital read / write + PWM + SPI - SS
#// 11 - digital read / write + PWM + SPI - MOSI
#// 12 - digital read / write +       SPI - MISO
#// 13 - digital read / write + LED + SPI - SCK
#// HOW TO USE
#// sending commands
#// general: all commands must be 7 bytes long + 1 ending byte
#// 1) to set the pinMode write a message with 7 characters on I2C bus to the arduino
#// first character = S for set pinMode
#// second & third character are pin ID 00 - 13 for digital pins & A0 - A3 for analog pins
#// fourth character is to set the mode I for INPUT, O for OUTPUT, P for INPUT_PULLUP
#// character 5,6,7 are not used, set to 000
#// e.g. S13O000 Sets pin 13 to an OUTPUT
#// 2) to turn the pin on or off write a message with 7 characters on I2C bus to the arduino
#// first character = W for digitalWrite
#// second & third character are pin ID 00 - 13 for digital pins & A0 - A3 for analog pins
#// fourth character is to turn off or on H for HIGH and L for LOW
#// character 5,6,7 are not used, set to 000
#// e.g. W13H000 turns pin 13 on
#// 3) to turn use PWM write a message with 7 characters on I2C bus to the arduino
#// first character = A for analogWrite
#// second & third character are pin ID 00 - 13 for digital pins & A0 - A3 for analog pins
#// forth character is not used, set to X
#// fifth - seventh character are used to write the PWM cycle (000-255)
#// e.g. A05X120 performs an analogWrite on digital pin 5 with a PWM cycle of 120
#// 4) to get a status with pin readings send Wire.requestFrom(device, #chars = 30)
#// the arduino will send back 30 chars
#// char 1-14 for each digital pin 1 = on 0 = off P = PWM
#// char 15-18 for reading of A0, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
#// char 19-22 for reading of A1, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
#// char 23-26 for reading of A2, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
#// char 27-30 for reading of A3, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
#// 5) to get the value for a single pin use pinValue(device,pin) to get the value back 1=HIGH, 0= LOW, P=PWM for digital pins and 0-1023 for analog pins
#// remark: the communication between the RPi and Arduino is very sensitive, especially for timings
#// as the RPi is much faster than the Arduino you need to included pauses between commands of atleast
#// 1 sec to be save, I found that 0.5 seconds works as well (most of the time) but in that case you
#// occasionally  need to perform a hard reset on the Arduino as it locks up.
#// Created 28 July 2013
#// This example code is in the public domain.
import smbus
import time
# RPi rev 1 = SMBus(0)
# RPi rev 2 = SMBus(1)
bus = smbus.SMBus(1)
# address of the Arduino use "i2cdetect -y 1" from the RPi prompt to detect the Arduinos (up to 127!)
device = 0x21
# initialize variables
pin      = ""  #holds the pin number 0 - 13 or A0 - A3
type     = ""  #holds the pin type: INPUT, OUTPUT, INPUT_PULLUP
mode     = ""  #holds the pinmode: HIGH, LOW, PWM
pwmValue = ""  #holds the pwmValue
pwm      = ""  #holds the pwmValue in 3 digits
val      = ""  #holds a String to be converted into ASCII
cmd      = ""  #holds the first byte of the message for the Arduino
message  = ""  #holds the second - seventh byte of the message for the Arduino
valCmd   = 88                #holds the command as ASCII value 88 = "X"
valMessage  = [88,88,88,88,88,88] #holds the Message as ASCII values
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine sends a setPin command to the Arduino to make a pin INPUT, OUTPUT or INPUT_PULLUP
def setPin(device, pin, type):
        cmd = "S"
        message = pinString(pin)+type[0]+"000"
        sendMessage(device, cmd, message)
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine sends a writePin command to the Arduino to turn a pin HIGH or LOW
def writePin(device, pin, mode):
        cmd = "W"
        message = pinString(pin)+mode[0]+"000"
        sendMessage(device, cmd, message)
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine send an analogWritePin command to the Arduino to set a PWM pin to a duty cycle between 0 and 255
def analogWritePin(device, pin, pwmValue):
        cmd = "A"
        message = pinString(pin)+"X"+pwmString(pwm)
        sendMessage(device, cmd, message)
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine converts Strings to ASCII code
def StringToBytes(val):
        retVal = []
        for c in val:
                retVal.append(ord(c))
        return retVal
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine actually transmits the command,
# sleep is required in order to prevent a request overload on the Arduino
def sendMessage(device, cmd, message):
        cmd=cmd.upper()
        message = message.upper()
        valCmd = ord(cmd)
        valMessage  = StringToBytes(message)
        print("Message: " + cmd + message + " send to device " + str(device))       
        bus.write_i2c_block_data(device, valCmd, valMessage)
        time.sleep(1)
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine send a request to the Arduino to provide a 30 byte status update, return all 30 bytes
def getStatus(device):
        status = ""
        for i in range (0, 30):
            status += chr(bus.read_byte(device))
            time.sleep(0.05);
        time.sleep(0.1)       
        return status
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine send a request to the Arduino to provide a 30 byte status update, return the value of a single pin
def pinValue(device,pin):
        status = ""
        for i in range (0, 30):
            status += chr(bus.read_byte(device))
            time.sleep(0.05);
        pinvalues = {'0':status[0],
                     '1':status[1],
                     '2':status[2],
                     '3':status[3],
                     '4':status[4],
                     '5':status[5],
                     '6':status[6],
                     '7':status[7],
                     '8':status[8],
                     '9':status[9],
                     '10':status[10],
                     '11':status[11],
                     '12':status[12],
                     '13':status[13],
                     'A0':int(status[14]+status[15]+status[16]+status[17])-1000,
                     'A1':int(status[18]+status[19]+status[20]+status[21])-1000,
                     'A2':int(status[22]+status[23]+status[24]+status[25])-1000,
                     'A3':int(status[26]+status[27]+status[28]+status[29])-1000}
        time.sleep(0.1)
        return  pinvalues[pin]
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine converts a 1 or 2 digit pin into a 2 digit equivalent
def pinString(pin):
        while len(pin) < 2:
              pin = "0"+pin;
        return pin
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this routine converts a 1, 2 or 3 digit pin into a 3 digit equivalent
def pwmString(pwm):
        while len(pwm) < 3:
              pwm = "0"+pwm;
        return pwm
# ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# this is where the main program starts
while True:
   setPin(33, "13", "Output"#on Arduino with I2C ID #33 set pin 13 to OUTPUT
   writePin(33,"13", "High")   #on Arduino with I2C ID #33 set pin 13 HIGH
   print ("Status pin 13 =" + pinValue(33,'13'))
   
   writePin(33,"13","Low")     #on Arduino with I2C ID #33 set pin 13 LOW
   print("30 byte status:" + getStatus(33))

This is the Arduino Slave code:

Arduino_I2C_slave_v0_21 (click to download from my dropbox)

// Arduino I2C Wire Slave version 0.21
// by Racer993 <https://raspberrypi4dummies.wordpress.com/&gt;

// Turns the Arduino to a I2C slave device (for the Raspberry Pi)
// using the Wire library. Configure pins, read and write to pins
// via a simple instruction set.

// Supported instructions
// pinMode = setPin(device, pinnumber, INPUT/OUTPUT/INPUT_PULLUP)
// digitalWrite = writePin(device,pinnumber,HIGH/LOW)
// analogWrite = analogWritePin(device,pinnumber,0-255)
// getStatus(device)

// A0 – analog read / digital write
// A1 – analog read / digital write
// A2 – analog read / digital write
// A3 – analog read / digital write
// A4 – IN USE as SDA
// A5 – IN USE as SCL

// 1 – digital read / write + RX
// 2 – digital read / write + TX + Interrupt
// 3 – digital read / write + PWM + Interrupt
// 4 – digital read / write
// 5 – digital read / write + PWM
// 6 – digital read / write + PWM
// 7 – digital read / write
// 8 – digital read / write
// 9 – digital read / write + PWM
// 10 – digital read / write + PWM + SPI – SS
// 11 – digital read / write + PWM + SPI – MOSI
// 12 – digital read / write + SPI – MISO
// 13 – digital read / write + LED + SPI – SCK

// HOW TO USE

// sending commands

// general: all commands must be 7 bytes long + 1 ending byte

// 1) to set the pinMode write a message with 7 characters on I2C bus to the arduino
// first character = S for set pinMode
// second & third character are pin ID 00 – 13 for digital pins & A0 – A3 for analog pins
// fourth character is to set the mode I for INPUT, O for OUTPUT, P for INPUT_PULLUP
// character 5,6,7 are not used, set to 000

// 2) to turn the pin on or off write a message with 7 characters on I2C bus to the arduino
// first character = W for digitalWrite
// second & third character are pin ID 00 – 13 for digital pins & A0 – A3 for analog pins
// fourth character is to turn off or on H for HIGH and L for LOW
// character 5,6,7 are not used, set to 000

// 3) to turn use PWM write a message with 7 characters on I2C bus to the arduino
// first character = A for analogWrite
// second & third character are pin ID 00 – 13 for digital pins & A0 – A3 for analog pins
// forth character is not used, set to X
// fifth – seventh character are used to write the PWM cycle (000-255)

// 4) to get a status with pin readings send Wire.requestFrom(device, #chars = 30)
// the arduino will send back 30 chars
// char 1-14 for each digital pin 1 = on 0 = off
// char 15-18 for reading of A0, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
// char 19-22 for reading of A1, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
// char 23-26 for reading of A2, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading
// char 27-30 for reading of A3, 1000 is added to the A0 reading in order to guarantee a 4 digit reading, subtract 1000 to get the proper reading

// Created 17 July 2013

// This example code is in the public domain.

#include <Wire.h>

void setup()
{
int arduinoI2CAddress = 33; // set the slave address for the Arduino on the I2C buss

Wire.begin(arduinoI2CAddress); // join i2c bus with specified address
Wire.onRequest(requestEvent); // register wire.request interrupt event
Wire.onReceive(receiveEvent); // register wire.write interrupt event
}

char sendStatus[31] = “000000000000000000000000000000”; // initialize the container variable
int index = 0; // initialize the index variable
char pwm[15] = “00000000000000”; // initialize the PWM flag container

void loop()
{

String pinStatus=””; // initialize pinStatus variable

for(int digitalPin = 0; digitalPin <= 13; digitalPin++) // loop through 14 digital pins 0 – 13
{
if (pwm[digitalPin] == 0) // in case PWM is off for the pin, read the pin status
{
pinStatus += String (digitalRead(digitalPin)); // read the pin status & add it to the container variable
}
else
{
pinStatus += “P”; // in case PWM is on for the pin, add P to the pin status container string
}
}

for(int analogPin = 0; analogPin <= 3; analogPin++) // loop through the 4 (unused) analog pins 0 – 3
{
pinStatus += String (1000+analogRead(analogPin)); // read the analog value from the pin, add 1000 to make it 4 digit & add it to the container variable
}

pinStatus.toCharArray(sendStatus, 31); // convert the container variable pinStatus to a char array which can be send over i2c

delay(1000); // wait for an interrupt event
}

//——————————————————————————–
// function that executes whenever a status update is requested by master
// this function is registered as an event, see setup()

void requestEvent() {
Wire.write(sendStatus[index]);
++index;
if (index >= 30) {
index = 0;
}
}

//——————————————————————————–
// function that executes whenever a message is received from master
// this function is registered as an event, see setup()

void receiveEvent(int howMany)
{
int receiveByte = 0; // set index to 0
char command[7]; // expect 7 char + 1 end byte
String mode = “”; // initialize mode variable for holding the mode
String pin = “”; // initialize pin variable for holding the pin number as a String
String awValue = “”; // intitalize the variable for holding the analogWrite value
int pinVal; // inititalize the variable for holding the pin number as integer
int awValueVal; // initialize the variable for holding the analog write value as integer (only PWM pins!)

while(Wire.available()) // loop through all incoming bytes
{
command[receiveByte] = Wire.read(); // receive byte as a character
receiveByte++; // increase index by 1
}

pin = String(command[1]) + String(command[2]); // combine byte 2 and 3 in order to get the pin number
awValue = String(command[4]) + String(command[5]) + String(command[6]); // combine byte 5, 6 and 7 in order to get the analogWrite value
awValueVal = awValue.toInt(); // convert the awValue string to a value

if (String(command[1]) != “A” ) { pinVal = pin.toInt();} // in case of not an analog pin assignment convert into digital pin number
if (String(command[1]) != “A” ) { pwm[pinVal] = 0;} // in case of not an analog pin assignment set PWM flag to 0

// incase of analog pin assignment determine analog pin to be set
if (String(command[1]) == “A” && String(command[2]) == “0”) { pinVal = A0;}
if (String(command[1]) == “A” && String(command[2]) == “1”) { pinVal = A1;}
if (String(command[1]) == “A” && String(command[2]) == “2”) { pinVal = A2;}
if (String(command[1]) == “A” && String(command[2]) == “3”) { pinVal = A3;}

// if requested set pinmode
if (String(command[0]) == “S” && String(command[3]) == “I”) { pinMode(pinVal, INPUT);}
if (String(command[0]) == “S” && String(command[3]) == “O”) { pinMode(pinVal, OUTPUT);}
if (String(command[0]) == “S” && String(command[3]) == “P”) { pinMode(pinVal, INPUT_PULLUP);}

// if requested perform digital write
if (String(command[0]) == “W” && String(command[3]) == “H”) { digitalWrite(pinVal, HIGH);}
if (String(command[0]) == “W” && String(command[3]) == “L”) { digitalWrite(pinVal, LOW);}
// if requested perform analog write
if (String(command[0]) == “A” && pinVal == 3 || pinVal == 5 || pinVal == 6 || pinVal == 9 || pinVal == 10 || pinVal == 11 )
{
analogWrite(pinVal, awValueVal);
pwm[pinVal] = 1;
}

}

The Pi Cam

Last weekend my Pi Cam arrived, on sunday I started some experiments, took some pictures and shot some video, but somehow I managed to screw up the installation after installing netcat and mplayer to bring up a Iive video stream from the Raspberry PI to my PC.

I’ll need to do some more experimenting before I can post a new image that provides streaming video from the raspberry to a windows pc.

Also I’ve started a Pyton programming course at codecademy.com. I want to combine an Arduino with my Raspberry to add some functions, like temperature reading. Communications should go via I2C. The whole setup should take a timelapse pictures of our garden, measure the water temperature, operate the water pump, stream music and switching the lights on and off, and I can probaly think of some more really not necessary things 😉

Fortunately Dropbox has enabled access to my public dropbox again 🙂

Happy downloading!

How to play Quake 3 on your Raspberry Pi

Today, I figured, it would be nice to do some old school fragging 🙂 It is time to get my Raspberry Pi to run Quake 3. There are quite a few tutorials, but it took me a couple of tries to find a combination that worked for me. 

For you, the quick way to get Quake 3 running on your Raspberry Pi is to download the Quake 3 SD card image for a 4GB SD Card from my public dropbox. You will find it under Images\Quake3\Quake3_4GB_autostart.zip In my previous posts I have explained how to mount an image on the SD Card by using Win32DiskImager. The image auto-starts Quake 3 on boot. In case you don’t want that, just use the following command after logging in:

sudo update-rc.d -f  quake3 remove 

Which removes Quake 3 from the start-up sequence. You can start the game by navigating to the directory where the game is located and start the game from there:

cd /home/pi/quake3/build/release-linux-arm
sudo ./ioquake3.arm

In case you insist in making your own image, this is how I got it to work:

Before you start, you need a 4GB SD Card with Raspbian Wheezy installed. Run sudo update and sudo upgrade. Start sudo raspi-config and expand the root partition to fill the SD card. Memory split should be configured with 64MB video memory. Reboot.

Step 1:

Log in to your Pi and then type at the command prompt:

sudo apt-get install git gcc build-essential libsdl1.2-dev

These tools are needed to install the Quake 3 source code!
Step 2:

Obtain the source code with this command:

git clone https://github.com/raspberrypi/quake3.git

Change to the Quake3 directory:

cd quake3
Step 3:

Edit the script that does the compilation:

nano build.sh
The first line (8) you are looking for starts with ARM_LIBS, change it so it says this:

ARM_LIBS=/opt/vc/lib
You also need to change the line (16) that starts with INCLUDES, change it to this:

INCLUDES=”-I/opt/vc/include -I/opt/vc/include/interface/vcos/pthreads”
The final line (19) to change starts CROSS_COMPILE:

# CROSS_COMPILE=bcm2708-
Save the file by pressing Ctrl-X followed by Y and finally return.
Step 4:

Now you can begin the compilation process by typing:

./build.sh

the process takes approximately 60 minutes!
Step 5:

Once that has finished you need to download the pak files. This lets the game function!

Type:

cd
cd quake3/build/release-linux-arm
wget https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/36774536/Images/Quake3/Q3DemoPaks.zip
unzip Q3DemoPaks.zip

The directory tree should look like this (using the default Pi user):

home
– pi
– – quake3
– – – build
– – – – release-linux-arm
– – – – – baseq3

and in the directory ‘baseq3’ there should be your PAK files.
Step 6:

Running the game: In order for you to run the game you have to be in the right directory, to get there type these commands:

cd
cd quake3/build/release-linux-arm
Start your game with this command:

sudo ./ioquake3.arm

In case you want Quake 3 to boot at start up follow the additional steps below:

Step 1:

sudo nano /etc/init.d/quake3

make the content of the file look like this:

#! /bin/sh
# /etc/init.d/quake3

### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides:          quake3
# Required-Start:    $remote_fs $syslog
# Required-Stop:     $remote_fs $syslog
# Default-Start:     2 3 4 5
# Default-Stop:      0 1 6
# Short-Description: Simple script to start quake3 at boot
# Description:       A simple script from https://raspberrypi4dummies.wordpress.com
### END INIT INFO

# If you want a command to always run, put it here
cd /home/pi/quake3/build/release-linux-arm
sudo ./ioquake3.arm

# Carry out specific functions when asked to by the system

exit 0

Save the file by pressing Ctrl-X followed by Y and finally return.

The last two commands complete the job of starting Quake 3 on boot:

sudo chmod 755 /etc/init.d/quake3
sudo update-rc.d quake3 defaults

HAPPY FRAGGING!

foto 4

Thin Client software for your Raspberry Pi with Wlan support.

RPiTC

The guys from the RPiTC project have released a new Raspberry Pi optimized image. The image is much quicker and supports WLAN out-of-the-box.

You can download the image from my dropbox. Extract the image from the RAR file with e.g. 7-ZIP and save it on a local drive of your PC. Write the image to an SD card as described in one of my previous posts with Win32Diskimager.

Start your Raspberry Pi with the prepared SD Card and with monitor, mouse and keyboard attached.

The Desktop shows the various pre-installed Thin Client applications like RDP, VMWare, Citrix, X2Go, xFreeRDP, Ice Weasel with ICA etc. I use Ice Weasel with ICA mostly.

You will have to connect either a LAN cable or setup a WiFi connection for a USB dongle.

WiFi is supported out-of-the-box for my Edimax WLAN Hi-Speed USB 2.0 EW-7811Un Nano.

WLAN configuration is done like this:

Right-click on the desktop and select LX-Terminal from the application menu. A Window with the command prompt will open. To get the WiFi working only one config file needs to be created and another needs to be modified.

STEP 1)

At the command promt type:

nano /etc/wpa.conf

The nano editor will open, make the contents look like this:

network={
proto=RSN
key_mgmt=WPA-PSK
pairwise=CCMP TKIP
group=CCMP TKIP
ssid=”YOUR-SSID
psk=”WPA-PASSWORD
}

press ctrl-x and y to save

STEP 2)

At the command promt type:

nano /etc/network/interfaces

The nano editor will open, make the contents look like this:

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
# auto eth0
# iface eth0 inet dhcp
auto wlan0
iface wlan0 inet dhcp
wpa-conf /etc/wpa.conf

press ctrl-x and y to save

reboot & you are good to go!

How to use your Raspberry Pi as Airprint Server.

Today, I was reading a PDF on my iPad and wanted to print a page from the PDF document on my printer, but Apple only supports printing to Airprint printers. So, no luck with my Samsung SCX-4824FN, or…..

With some google-ing I found a way to turn the Raspberry-Pi into an Airprint server. The Airprint server connects to your non-Airprint printer via USB or network-connection and gives your Apple device (iPhone or iPad) access to it. It works marvelous!

I used the instructions from this website.

In summary:
(click here  or here you want to skip the work and just download the SD-Card image, you will need a PPD for your printer as well (see text below) )

1) Use a fresh wheezy image

2) connect to the raspberry pi via SSH
standard credentials are user: pi password: raspberry

3) switch to admin: sudo su

4) update, upgrade & install packages

sudo aptitude update
sudo aptitude upgrade
sudo aptitude install avahi-daemon
sudo aptitude install avahi-discover
sudo aptitude install libnss-mdns
sudo aptitude install cups
sudo aptitude install cups-pdf

sudo aptitude install python-cups

5) start services
sudo usermod -aG lpadmin pi
sudo /etc/init.d/cups start
sudo /etc/init.d/avahi-daemon start

6) Now edit the CUPS configuration file

sudo nano /etc/cups/cupsd.conf

You’ll need to set-up the listeningport. Comment out the line that reads “Listen localhost:631″. Add in “Port 631″. It should look like this:

#Listen localhost:631
Port 631

CUPS must be configured to work with any hostname, so it functions with AirPrint. The ServerAlias * directive needs to be added before the first occurence of <Location />. It should look like this:

# CUPS to work with any hostname
ServerAlias *

The config file must also be edited for enabling local access to the server by adding “Allow @Local” This must be done in the following three areas of the config file:

# Restrict access to the server…
# Restrict access to the admin pages…
# Restrict access to configuration files…

then save the config file (ctrl-x and Y)

7) restart the service
sudo /etc/init.d/cups restart

8) CUPS configuration

PPD
before you start this step, make sure that you have the PPD (Postscript Printer Description) for your printer. I had trouble at first finding the PPD for my Samsung printer but it appeared to be included in the UnifiedLinuxDriver package which can be downloaded from the Samsung website. I only needed to unzip the UnifiedLinuxDriver_1.00.tar.gz and browse to the PPD directory. The PPD can stay on your windows / linux machine as it will be uploaded via the CUPS web interface later on.

Navigate the the CUPS configuration page by typing the IP address from your Raspberry Pi in your browser + the CUPS port number (so it’ll be an address like 192.168.xxx.xxx:631). A security exception message may pop up but that’s ok. Continue onwards!

Plug your printer into one of the USB ports of the Raspberry Pi or use a network printer on the same network of the Raspberry Pi. Click “add printer” (At this stage, you might be asked for the username (Pi) and password (Raspberry) of the Raspberry Pi.) in the CUPS web interface and it should appear in the list of available printers. You’ll have to fill in details for the printer, such as name and location. You can enter whatever you want in here but the important part is ensuring you tick the “share this printer” box. Following this, you’ll have to select the appropriate printer driver from a (large) list that appears or use a PPD. Enter print and paper settings too. You’re now ready to click on maintenance > print test page. If everything has gone to plan, the test page will print successfully.

Now, click on the Admin tab and view the server settings which are towards the right-hand side of the screen. Tick the box that says “share printers connected to this system”.

9) Setup Avahi service

cd ../../opt
sudo mkdir airprint

cd airprint
sudo wget -O airprint-generate.py –no-check-certificate https://raw.github.com/tjfontaine/airprint-generate/master/airprint-generate.py

sudo chmod 755 airprint-generate.py
sudo ./airprint-generate.py -d /etc/avahi/services

10) create Airprint files

cd /usr/share/cups/mime

sudo nano airprint.types

#
# “$Id: $”
#
# AirPrint type
image/urf urf string(0,UNIRAST)
#
# End of “$Id: $”.
#

ctrl-x and Y to save

sudo nano airprint.convs

#
# “$Id: $”
#
# AirPrint
# Updated list with minimal set 25 Sept
image/urf application/pdf 100 pdftoraster
#
# End of “$Id: $”.
#

ctrl-x and Y to save

sudo service cups restart

11) And finally the last commands

cd
cd ../../opt/airprint
sudo wget https://raw.github.com/tjfontaine/airprint-generate/master/airprint-generate.py
sudo ./airprint-generate.py -d /etc/avahi/services
sudo reboot

And for everybody that wants to save time, you can download an image for a 2GB SD Card from my public dropbox  look for the following file 20130502 Wheezy with Airprint 2GB.zip in \images\Airprint\. Alternatively you can download it from google drive.

It is probably best to install the image onto a 4GB (or larger) SD-Card. Be sure to run sudo raspi-config the first time in order to expand the file system, to make full use of the available space.

Raspi-Config

Enjoy!

Many thx to Lynsay’s Little World

NEW Airpi images for 2GB SD Cards

I’ve just published new images for the AirPi with iOS6 support, that fit on a 2GB SD card.
For everyone that wants to save the time, you can download the image directly from my public dropbox.
Both images are based on Rasbian Wheezy and configured withthe following default settings:
– SSH enabled
– User = pi
– Password = raspberry
– locale = en_US.UTF8
– timezone = Europe.Berlin
– broadcast name = AirPi
The file names are:
20130416 Wheezy AirPi with WLAN (works via onboard 3.5mm sound jack)
20130416 Wheezy AirPi with WLAN and USB sound
Write the image to a 2GB SD card using Win32DiskImager.
In case that you prefer to use the USB sound it might be wise to use a USB extension cable for the wifi dongle, in order to place it at a distance from the USB sound dongle. In my setup I experienced quite some interference when the WLAN dongle was close the USB Sound dongle.
 
How to set the WLAN
Both images work with both LAN or WLAN
connect to the Raspeberry Pi via SSH or connect keyboard & monitor directly to the Raspberry Pi
WLAN configuration can be set using the following command:
sudo nano /etc/network/interfaces
look for the lines with
wpa-ssid “YOUR SSID”
wpa-psk “YOUR PASSWORD”
and replace YOUR SSID with the SSID of your network and replace YOUR PASSWORD with the password of your network.
ctrl-x and Y to save changes
sudo reboot
ready!
If there is no WLAN connection the Raspberry Pi will use the LAN connection if available.
How to set the broadcast name of the Airpi
The broadcast name of the Raspberry AirPi can easily by changed, at the command prompt type:
sudo nano /etc/init.d/shairport 
look for the following line
DAEMON_ARGS=”-w $PIDFILE -a AirPi”
and change AirPi in what ever you like.
ctrl-x and Y to save changes
sudo reboot
ready!
I have tested the setup with the Edimax EW-7811Un, the Logilink UA0053 USB soundcard and a generic C-Media USB soundcardUSB Sound